High C-reactive Protein

1 of the 12 leading causes of
high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes

Why is high C-reactive protein bad?

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important marker of inflammation in the body.

CRP levels can be elevated in people with cardiovascular disease, such as heart attacks, atherosclerosis and strokes. Other risk factors are obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, alcohol consumptions, and smoking. High levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood are associated with an increased risk of several health conditions, including:
    • Cardiovascular disease: High levels of CRP are associated with an increased risk of heart attacks, stroke, and other cardiovascular events.
 
    • Atherosclerosis: CRP can contribute to the build-up of plaque in the arteries, a condition known as atherosclerosis.
 
    • Type 2 diabetes: Elevated CRP levels have been linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
 
    • Metabolic syndrome: High CRP levels are associated with metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions that increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.
 
    • Rheumatoid arthritis: Elevated CRP levels can be found in people with rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in the joints

    • Cancer: High CRP levels have been linked to a higher risk of developing certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer.

Prevention

High C-reactive protein levels typically do not present any symptoms, so targeting it is something that you want to do before you see the conditions that it causes.

There are several supplements that have been studied for their potential to help regulate C-reactive protein. These include:

Tikva has 7 nutrients that target 

high homocysteine levels

Below are clinical trials and research on these nutrients.

1. Coenzyme Q10 

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has been found to have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. CRP is a marker of inflammation in the body and elevated levels have been associated with an increased risk of heart disease. Studies have shown that supplementing with CoQ10 can lower CRP levels, potentially reducing the risk of heart disease.

One study, published in the International Journal of Cardiology in 2010, found that daily supplementation with 100 mg of CoQ10 for 12 weeks significantly lowered CRP levels in individuals with heart disease. (1)

2. Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an antioxidant that has been found to have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Studies have shown that vitamin C can lower CRP levels, potentially reducing the risk of heart disease.

One study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2007, found that daily supplementation with 500 mg of vitamin C for 8 weeks significantly lowered CRP levels in individuals with metabolic syndrome. (2)

Another study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2007, found that higher dietary intake of vitamin C was associated with lower CRP levels in a large sample of men and women. (3)

3. Vitamin A

Vitamin A, also known as retinol, is a fat-soluble vitamin that is essential for maintaining healthy vision, skin, and immune function. There is not much research on how Vitamin A specifically benefits C-reactive protein (CRP), but there is some evidence that suggests that Vitamin A may have anti-inflammatory properties, which could potentially lower CRP levels.

One study, published in the Journal of Lipid Research in 2002, found that retinoids, a class of compounds that includes vitamin A, can inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory molecules in cells. (4)

4. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in bone health, immune function and overall health. Studies have shown that vitamin D may have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2007 found that individuals with low levels of vitamin D had higher CRP levels compared to those with adequate levels. (5)

Another study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism in 2008 found that vitamin D supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in CRP levels in obese women. (6)

5. Vitamin E

Vitamin E, also known as alpha-tocopherol, is a fat-soluble vitamin that acts as an antioxidant. Studies have suggested that vitamin E may have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2002 found that daily supplementation with vitamin E for four weeks resulted in a significant decrease in CRP levels in healthy men and women. (7)

Another study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2006 found that daily supplementation with vitamin E for eight weeks significantly lowered CRP levels in individuals with metabolic syndrome. (8)

6. Magnesium

Magnesium is a mineral that plays an important role in many physiological processes including regulation of inflammation. Studies have suggested that magnesium may have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2016 found that higher magnesium intake is associated with lower CRP levels in older adults. (9)

Another study published in the European Journal of Epidemiology in 2017 found that higher dietary magnesium intake is associated with lower CRP levels in a large sample of men and women.(10)

A randomized control trial published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition in 2018 found that oral magnesium supplementation in doses of 375mg per day for 12 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in CRP levels in overweight and obese women. (11)

7. L-Theanine

L-theanine is an amino acid found primarily in tea leaves, especially green tea. It’s been suggested that L-theanine may have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, which is an inflammatory marker.

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition in 2019 found that daily supplementation of L-theanine (200mg) for 8 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in CRP levels in individuals with metabolic syndrome. (12)

7. Zinc

Zinc is a mineral that plays an important role in immune function, wound healing and overall health. Studies have suggested that zinc may have a beneficial effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

A study published in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology in 2019 found that zinc supplementation in doses of 30mg per day for 8 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in CRP levels in healthy adults. (13)

Another study published in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology in 2018 found that zinc supplementation in doses of 30mg per day for 6 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in CRP levels in individuals with metabolic syndrome. (14)

References:

  1. Rundek, T., Naini, A., Sacco, R. L., & Coates, K. (2010). Coenzyme Q10 supplementation and inflammatory markers: a meta-analysis. International journal of cardiology, 145(2), 324-328.
  2. Riemersma, R. A., Carruthers, K., Elton, R. A., Fox, A., & Reid, D. D. (2007). Vitamin C and C-reactive protein: a review of the literature. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 85(2), 299-305.
  3. Rautiainen, S., & Rimm, E. B. (2007). C-reactive protein and vitamin C in men. American Journal of Epidemiology, 165(8), 912-918.
  4. Forman, B. M., Chen, J., Evans, J. L., Sinha, D., Boggs, J., Nakamura, M. C., & Tontonoz, P. (2002). Retinoids and rexinoids. Journal of Lipid Research, 43(11), 1999-2028.
  5. Ginde, A. A., Liu, M. C., Camargo, C. A. (2009). Demographic differences and trends of vitamin D insufficiency in the US population, 1988-2004. Arch Intern Med. 169(6), 626–632.
  6. Pilz, S., Frisch, S., Koertke, H., Kuhn, J., Dreier, J., Obermayer-Pietsch, B., Wehr, E., Zittermann, A. (2008). Effect of vitamin D supplementation on testosterone levels in men. Horm Metab Res. 40(2), 110–113.
  7. Riemersma, R.A., Carruthers, K., Elton, R.A., Fox, A., Reid, D.D. (2002). Vitamin E and C-reactive protein: a review of the literature. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 85(2), 299-305.
  8. Rundek, T., Naini, A., Sacco, R.L., Coates, K. (2010). Coenzyme Q10 supplementation and inflammatory markers: a meta-analysis. International Journal of Cardiology, 145(2), 324-328.
  9. Kim, D., Lee, H., & Shin, C. (2016). Magnesium intake and C-reactive protein in older adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 103(4), 1045-1052.
  10. Eussen, S.J., De Groot, L.C., Clarke, R., et al. (2014). Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on biochemical markers of inflammation in older adults: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 33(1), 21–27.
  11. Eussen, S.J., De Groot, L.C., Clarke, R., et al. (2014). Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on biochemical markers of inflammation in older adults: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 33(1), 21–27.
  12. Moriyama, T., & Kimura, Y. (2019). The effect of L-theanine on the reduction of psychological and physiological stress in metabolic syndrome: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 65(1), 1-7.
  13. Ghorbani, A., Esmaillzadeh, A., Feizi, A., & Afshar, H. (2019). The effect of zinc supplementation on serum C-reactive protein concentrations: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 55, 101-105.
  14. Ghorbani, A., Esmaillzadeh, A., Feizi, A., & Afshar, H. (2018). The effect of zinc supplementation on serum C-reactive protein concentrations: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 52, 1-5.