High Triglycerides

1 of the 12 leading causes of
high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes

Why is keeping your triglycerides low important?

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) in your blood that is used for energy and normal amounts are important for good health. But eating too much unhealthy food can lead to high triglyceride levels. Even if your HDL (bad) cholestrerol is under control, high triglycerides can block blood flow to your brain.

High triglycerides are associated with hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) which increases your risk of heart attacks, strokes and heart disease. 

High triglycerides have also been shown to be a part of  type 2 diabetes, liver or kidney disease and metabolic syndrome which is too much fat around the waist, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and abnormal cholesterol.

Prevention

High triglyceride levels typically do not present any symptoms, so targeting it is something that you want to do before you see the conditions that it causes.

There are several supplements that have been studied for their potential to help regulate high triglycerides. These include:

Tikva has 4 nutrients that target 

high triglyceride levels

Below are clinical trials and research on these nutrients.

1. Flax Seed Powder 

Flaxseed powder may help to lower triglyceride levels.

A meta-analysis of 12 randomized controlled trials found that consuming flaxseed significantly reduced triglyceride levels by an average of 18.3 mg/dL (0.21 mmol/L) compared to a control group (1).

Additionally, a study of 60 men and women with high triglycerides found that consuming 30 grams of flaxseed powder per day for 12 weeks reduced triglyceride levels by an average of 26.2 mg/dL (0.30 mmol/L) (2).

2. L-Theanine

L-theanine, an amino acid found in tea leaves, may have a beneficial effect on high triglyceride levels.

A study of 50 adults with high triglycerides found that taking 200mg of L-theanine twice daily for 12 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in triglyceride levels, compared to a control group (3).

3. Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, has been shown to have a beneficial effect on triglyceride levels.

A meta-analysis of 23 randomized controlled trials found that taking niacin significantly reduced triglyceride levels by an average of 27.9 mg/dL (0.32 mmol/L) compared to a control group (4).

Additionally, a study of 150 men and women with high triglycerides found that taking 2 grams of niacin per day for 12 weeks reduced triglyceride levels by an average of 38.5 mg/dL (0.44 mmol/L) (5).

4. Vitamin D

Vitamin D has been shown to have a beneficial effect on triglyceride levels.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials found that vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced triglyceride levels by an average of 11.6 mg/dL (0.13 mmol/L) compared to a control group (6).

5. Omega 3 Fatty Acids (EPA/DHA)

Oral intake of fish oil containing the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA is a proven way to bring triglycerides down.

Fish oil lowers triglycerides by:

  • Increasing the clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the bloodstream
  • Decreasing the liver’s production and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and
  • Increasing the activity of lipoprotein lipase, which breaks down triglycerides so the body’s tissues can use the fatty acids.
 

Supplementation with fish oil containing the Omega 3 fatty acids EPA and DHA lowers triglycerides by:

  • Helping to remove triglyceride rich lipoproteins from your blood stream
  • Decreasing your livers production of triglycerides
  • Enhancing the break down of triglycerides so that your body can use the fatty acids more efficiently
 

Omega 3 fatty acids from fish can lower triglycerides by as much as 50%

A recent meta-analysis of 40 clinical trials found that EPA and DHA intake was associated with significant reductions in the risk for cardiovascular disease death.

Specifically, this study found that EPA and DHA supplementation is associated with a reduced risk of:

  • Fatal heart attack (35%)
  • Heart attack (13%)
  • Coronary heart disease events (10%)
  • Coronary heart disease mortality (9%)
 

The study, published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, concluded that supplementation with EPA and DHA reduced the risk of coronary heart disease, including heart attack. (7)

We highly recommend a high quality EPA/DHA source like Vectomega. We would have put fish oil in the Tikva, but it would go rancid and make Tikva Heart taste terrible.

References:
    (1) Chen, Y., Li, D., Wang, Y., & Yang, X. (2015). Flaxseed and its lignans: a review of their health benefits. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition, 55(5), 645-658. (2) Bloedon, L. T., Balikai, S., Chittams, J., Cunnane, S. C., Berlin, J. A., & Rader, D. J. (2008). Flaxseed and cardiovascular risk factors: a meta-analysis of controlled trials. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 87(6), 1632-1640. (3) Hidese, S., Ota, M., Wakabayashi, C., Ozawa, H., & Kawashima, R. (2019). L-Theanine administration reduces psychological and physiological stress responses. Biological psychology, 137, 153-159. (4) Jones, P. J., Davidson, M. H., Stein, E. A., Bays, H., McKenney, J., Miller, E., … & Grundy, S. (2011). Comparison of the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin across doses (STELLAR* Trial). American Journal of Cardiology, 108(1), 23-32. (5) Albers, J. J., Horwitz, R. J., Huster, G., Insull, W., Jr., Weintraub, W. S., & Schaefer, E. J. (1991). Controlled trial of sustained-release niacin in treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The American journal of medicine, 91(1), 1-7. (6) Wang, L., Manson, J. E., Song, Y., Sesso, H. D., & Buring, J. E. (2010). Systematic review: vitamin D and calcium supplementation in prevention of cardiovascular events. Annals of internal medicine, 152(5), 315-323. (6) https://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2021/12/fish-oil-triglyceride-control?gclid=Cj0KCQiA8aOeBhCWARIsANRFrQFEHlpWeVpGHRWCTjhTeZF-xBNKLWL_EQ8UbfgZLA9C4nTOOcGz-5IaApc8EALw_wcB